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  • Caribbean nation joins global movement to protect sharks

    In a strong move for the marine conservation movement, the government of the Bahamas has banned commercial fishing for sharks, as well as selling, exporting, or importing shark meat. The archipelago has one of the most diverse and healthiest shark populations in the world, and this move will ensure a healthy future for the often maligned creatures. Not only is it a good move from a conservation and marine ecosystem standpoint, but also from a tourism standpoint as thousands of people visit the region annually to dive with sharks and other marine wildlife.

    According to the Pew Environment Group, 73 million sharks are killed annually, and often just for their fins to be used in shark fin soup. As apex predators in the sea, their survival is crucial for the health of the entire ecosystem, and the government and people of the Bahamas should be praised for their sound decision making.

    - Mitchell Flexo

    (via MSNBC)

    Photo: A shark in waters off the Bahamas. (AP via NYT)

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    CONSERVATION

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    Goth of the Bay

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    The Duck Version of Sid Vicious

    I remember spotting my first red-breasted merganser in Brooklyn as it paddled along the bulkheads lining Jamaica Bay. It was a strangely warm February day, snow lingered amid the shoreline grasses and the bird peeked in and out of a drifting, intermittent fog. I was an excited young bird-watcher, and any bird was worth looking up in one of the three field guides I carried with me. I had been......read more

    Hope In The Era Of Trump's Climate Foolishness

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    The Editorial Board of The New York Times

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    The Mayor of Ballerat

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    By Mickey Todiwala

    Meet Rock Novak - the caretaker, the mayor, the sheriff, the judge and the undertaker of the ghost town, Ballarat.  Is it a clever documentary or a bleak satire?  ...read more

    Free California of Fossil Fuel

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    By Bill McKibben

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    Coal Is Killing The Planet. Trump Loves It.

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    UN Scientist Issue Dire Report

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    During the lead-up to the 2016 presidential election, Donald Trump won over voters in coal country by claiming he would keep mines open, and retain coal as a prominent energy source in the U.S. His argument was an economic one: He knew that miners were worried about their jobs, and that many did not see a path forward should the mines close. But closing mines does not......read more

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